a sheep standing on a mountain-side road with a camera on its back

photo credit Visit Faroe Islands

Another week come and gone, and here are your environmental news highlights for the week!

 

☀   Nunavut saw record high temperatures on Wednesday, with the thermometer measuring a staggering 29.2° Celcius. The previously held record was in 1994 of 28.1°. (via theweathernetwork

 

☀  Australian scientists are investigating an outbreak of herpes amongst green sea turtles in the Great Barrier Reef. The infection causes disfiguring tumours around the eyes, mouth, flippers, neck and genitals of the turtles.This is reflecting similar outbreaks around the world for ocean animals and scientists are citing pollution as the triggering cause, but are still conducting research into the specific chemicals at fault. (via gizmodo

 

☀   Another interesting week for developments in transit, China has started running tests on a bus that will straddle two lanes of traffic on highways. The hope is to reduce congestion and air pollution. (via inhabitat)

 

☀   Fresh drinking water will finally be coming to the Slate Falls First Nation in Northern Ontario. After years of lobbying, the community has been granted an $11.6 million dollar investment from the federal government. The project will be completed by December 2017. (via cbc.ca)

 

☀   Parks Canada is under fire this week after a report published by the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society put forth numerous complaints about the organization not following their mandate. Parks Canada has been pushing development and tourism over the protection of the lands and animals under Parks Canada jurisdiction, leading to abuses and environmental damage. (via cbc.ca)

 

☀   The Trudeau government is seriously considering re-opening a prison farm program that was cancelled in 2010. The progam sees eligible inmates work part of their sentences on farms, learning a variety of marketable skills as well as encouraging horticultural therapy techniques. The program was seen as highly successful with participants having very low levels of recidivism. (via thestar.ca)

 

☀   Ontario is facing one of the worst droughts since the 1930s and farmers are becoming seriously concerned about both the short-term and long-term effects of this hot summer. (via huffingtonpost)

 

☀   The devil themselves, Monsanto, is in the news again this week with their Roundup product being found directly linked to the increase in algae blooms taking over lakes in North America. Lake Erie is the latest water body to fall to this chemical, with the blooms creating 'dead zones' where fish cannot survive. (via alternet.org).

 

☀   More algae-related concerns, this time in Florida. In the past four years, almost 150 manatees have been killed due to increased algae in the water. The algae suffocates the water, destroying the food for manatees who then attempt to eat the algae, which then sends them into either acute shock or causes them to drown. (via theorlandosentiel)

 

☀   This week the Minister for the Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna, met with Indigenous youth in Niagara Falls at the AFN Annual General Assembly. The meetings were designed to put a new focus on the role of Indigenous peoples, the environment and the unique role youth can play. (via governmentofcanada)

 

☀   A Quebec fisherman has caught the first known Asian Carp in the St Lawrence River. The fish is highly invasive with environmentalists and fishermen alike sharing in the worry of what is to come. (via keepcanadafishing)

 

☀   The Faroe Islands in the north Atlantic have developed an ingenious solution to a problem. Google has yet to do a Street View program on the Islands, so the residents have gotten together and outfitted sheep with cameras to do it themselves. You can see the footage of the project here and you can see one of the roaming sheep as the photo header for this very post. (via theguardian).

 

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