The Wild Side

Narwhals surfacing in Nunavut/Paul Nicklen — Provided by WWF-Canada
Government researchers and World Wildlife Fund experts seek to uncover elusive narwhal activities at Tallurutiup Tariunga.
One of four newly discovered titi monkeys in Brazil/Diogo Afonso Silva
Global biodiversity is in crisis, but a new wave of technology and interest in conservation science has led to a boom in identifying new species, including mammals.
Smoke covers Hwy 1 near Kamloops/Photo by Tonyglen14 CC BY 2.0
As BC declares a state of emergency over spreading wildfires, one Simon Fraser researcher weighs in with suggestions for keeping kids safe from smoke inhalation.
Forest fires rage in northern Alberta in 2009/Cameron Strandberg CC BY-2.0
Uncontrolled fires are burning across North America. To get ahead of them, fire fighters and need modern tools. And government cash.
Elephant successfully translocated to Addo Elephant National Park/Matt Hayward
The need for translocating some the planet's megafauna is challenging, but government agencies must take risks in the name of global biodiversity.
MNRF water bomber on a sortie over northern Ontario. (Ryan McGilchrist) CC BY-SA
Lightning strikes have caused dozens of forest fires across the province in recent weeks, tens of thousands of hectares in size.
Woodland caribou in Jasper National Park. (ThartmannWiki. 2014) CC A-SA4
A recent study suggests Canada's forestry sector and its allies in conservative think tanks have intentionally spread misinformation for years to cover-up their role in the decline of caribou nationwide.
Loch Ness expert Adrian Shine helping sample eDNA. Kieran Hennigan. CC BY-SA.
Environmental DNA gained prominence helping researchers trace invasive species. Today, it's finding new life helping scientists detect legendary monsters.
A mosquito finds its host. (Jim Gathany. Center for Disease Control. 2003)
Bad mosquito season? Weather and climate play a major role.
Make it Kenya
Live stream project allows the world a new view of animal migration in Kenya
Hives for Humanity
Hives for Humanity is enhancing communities in British Columbia through apiculture
(Photo: a cougar stands on a riverbank)
There is still hope that Atlantic Canada is home to eastern cougars.
(Photo: a Canadian lynx walks through the snow)
The Canadian lynx population experiences frightening dips and climbs every decade, following behind the cycle of its main food source, the snowshoe hare.
(Photo: a pine marten clings to a fence in Nova Scotia)
Once eradicated from many areas of Canada, the pine marten is being reintroduced to new habitats.
Puffins by Brian Gratwicke via Flickr
Scientists are noticing worrying rates of infant mortality in Atlantic puffin populations – the cause of death is starvation.
Basking Shark | Chris Gotschalk photo
Though often portrayed as man-eaters in the media, sharks rarely attack people. In fact, you are more likely to be killed by a dog bite, a collapsing sand hole or a lightning strike than by a shark.
A North Atlantic Right Whale mother with her calf
Will the North Atlantic right whale lose the race against extinction?
Piping Plover | ShutterGlow Photo
A victim of unintended consequences, the piping plover shows no signs of recovery.
NOAA Fisheries Photo
The first blue whale research organization in the world is at risk of disappearing from the coast.
Great Auks
Tales of humanity's last encounters with three species that once called Atlantic Canada home.
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